Sort of like 'eHarmony' ...

‘Rapid Response Team’ Pairs Scientists and Media

GraphicThink of it as the climate scientists/journalists version of “eHarmony.” A volunteer website launched by scientists serves as a matchmaking venue for media outlets and government officials looking for input on climate science topics.

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Making the Complicated Clear: Interactive Graphics Make Data Visual

Bringing data to life online need not require technically-savvy Web designers. With some easy-to-use free tools, journalists can build interactive graphics for use online, making the complex easier to grasp. Get examples and sources to “do it yourself.”

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Incremental? Yes. But A Growing Role for Social Sciences in Climate Change Dialog

No more assuming that scientific data alone will carry the day with the public and its policymakers. The continuing climate change polarization shows more of the same approach won’t work. Michigan Professor Andrew Hoffman insists that social scientists increasingly need to be part of the dialog.

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Academy Draws Scientists, Artists to Hollywood for ‘Summit’ on Science Education

LOS ANGELES, CA — “After a winter like this, how can you believe in global warming?” … “Climate change? Earth’s climate has always changed. Temperatures go up, temperatures go down.” … “Doesn’t the sun have something to do with it getting hotter?”

You’ve heard it all before. The disconnect between climate science and what many Americans choose to believe is huge. With public understanding of science alarmingly low nationwide, what’s the answer?

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AMS Weather/Climate Scientists Join With Washington Artists for ‘Forecast’ Exhibit

The weather outside was — what else might one expect, it being Seattle in mid-January? — cloudy, overcast, with on and off showers.

The climate inside, by contrast, was bustling, somewhat frenetic, with American Meteorological Society (AMS) meeting attendants (a record 3,569) ceaselessly swarming from one concurrent session to the next, from one quick passing hand shake and “How ya been?” among long-time acquaintances … to the next.

And between the ground floor and the upper reaches of the Washington State Convention Center, there was a peaceful and low-key original art exhibit, a good place to think and reflect, to briefly get away from the bustle, the meeting and greeting. All donated for an 11-week exhibition, and all with a focus on subjects near and dear to the heart of the AMS annual meeting: “Forecast: Communicating Weather and Climate.”

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Global Temperature Reports: A Media ‘Pain’, But Valuable and Important Duty for Scientists


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Punxsutawney Phil says early spring in 2011! (Source: breakingnewsweek.com)

The annual ritual of publishing global temperature reports has become something akin to climate change’s Super Bowl. Much anticipation. A series of numbers flashed on the scoreboard. Tons of press. Load roars (and choice words for the refs) issuing from the bleachers. And much post-game analysis.

Or perhaps the annual report on the global temperature of the year-just-ended can be compared to/contrasted with the annual February rite of reporting on one of Pennsylvania’s best-known residents, Punxsutawney Phil, whose shadow, or lack thereof, is, legend holds, the harbinger for a late or early spring, respectively.

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‘The Simpsons’ Take on Climate Change

In 1989, cartoonist Matt Groening told a reporter that his new television show, “The Simpsons,” would tackle the serious subjects in life.

“It always amazes me how few cartoonists in print or animation go after the bigger issues, the kinds of things that keep you lying awake in the middle of the night,” Groening said, as reported in “Planet Simpson: How A Cartoon Masterpiece Defined A Generation,” a 2004 book about the show by journalist Chris Turner.

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