Cloudy Controversies: The Science Behind the Spencer-Braswell Paper

There’s a lesson to be learned from an editor’s having resigned over his journal’s publication of a research report thought to have been inadequately reviewed: extraordinary claims must be supported by extraordinary evidence. Headline writers and media … take note.

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Degree of Scientific Consensus Underestimated

Five ‘Potentially Distinct Groups’ Seen in Survey of TV Meteorologists

A new national survey of broadcast meteorologists provides a more refined and nuanced portrait than the broad-brush image of their generally being steadfastly resistant to much of the established climate science.

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Climate Links to Severe Weather: More Frequent in Media, And Just as Tricky

‘The new normal.’ It’s become something of a cliché, as with weird weather. Can the media and bloggers learn from their journalistic lessons in early coverage of the war on terror in resisting the pack mentality common to interests on ‘both sides.’ How best to proceed, report, and inform while the evidence is still being gathered and interpreted?

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Flogging the Media … But Really?

Both ‘sides’ in the climate change policy debate might at least share one thing in common: disdain for the media. News reporters covering climate issues are often singled out for their stories, and sometimes justifiably so. But critics could sharpen their criticisms if they want reporters to do a better job.

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Editor’s Apologetic Resignation Blows Gaping Hole in Over-Hyped Media Story

An editor’s public resignation over his journal’s acceptance of a controversial report illustrates both the shortcomings of peer review and the over-hyping of a study by some in the media. The first in a series of regular postings.

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Carbon Calculators: Do They Really Work?

This first feature in a new “On the Quad …” series by college students studying climate change and communications was written by Amelia Prior, now in her sophomore year at George Washington University in Washington, D.C. A student of writing instructor and Yale Forum regular contributor Michael Svoboda, Prior in this piece looks at carbon footprint calculators and their potential as communications tools.

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A Personal Memory

Spending A Week Above Arctic Circle On M.S. Fram Off Greenland’s West Coast

An extraordinary week abroad a Norwegian cruise line ship leaves indelible memories of Greenland, the tiny settlements housing many of its 57,600 residents, and its vital and shrinking ice sheet and calving glaciers.

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