Flooded street
A tidally flooded street near Miami, Florida (photo courtesy of Union of Concerned Scientists).

Nicole Hernandez Hammer spent years as a researcher, but she worried that information about sea-level rise was not getting to everyone who needs it.

Hammer: “I looked at the U.S. Census Data, and I saw that the places that are the most vulnerable to sea-level rise also happened to be some of the places that have the largest and or fastest growing Latino communities. And no one was talking about that.”

To share what she had learned with these communities, Hammer moved from academia to advocacy. Today, she is the southeast climate advocate for the Union of Concerned Scientists.

She works in low-lying and low-income communities in places like South Florida – communities that are vulnerable to flooding, and have residents with fewer resources to cope.

Hammer: “People don’t realize what’s causing the flooding. A lot of times they think it’s just weak infrastructure, but in reality it’s the impacts of climate change.”

What's causing the flooding in Miami: weak infrastructure ... or impacts of climate change? Click To Tweet

Hammer talks to people on the street and holds meetings to educate residents about sea-level rise and how to adapt.

Hammer: “The more information they have up front, the better prepared they’re going to be as we see more tidal flooding.”

By sharing the stories of how the impacts of climate change are affecting residents’ lives, she encourages elected officials to take action.

Reporting credit: ChavoBart Digital Media.
Photo: A tidally flooded street near Miami, Florida (Photo courtesy of Union of Concerned Scientists).

Filed under: ,