Empty plate

For five days in April, Richard Thomas of Waterville, Maine, ate no solid food. He was not sick, and it was not part of a cleansing diet. He was fasting to encourage deeper reflection on climate change.

Thomas: “Climate change is already harming our agriculture, and unless we do a lot more to deal with the problem, our grandkids are probably going to have to deal with hunger.”

About 20 people, mostly from his church, joined him in the fast. Some stopped eating for just one day, others for longer.

He says for many participants, the fast inspired further action. Some are now organizing candidate forums focused on climate change. Others have formed a group to meditate and pray about climate change and its meaning in their lives.

Thomas: “The goal here is to approach the issue in a spiritual way, not in an angry, frustrated way.”

'The goal here is to approach the issue in a spiritual way, not in an angry, frustrated way.' Click To Tweet

For Thomas, experiencing hunger strengthened his resolve to protect people and the earth.

Thomas: “It has motivated me to work a little bit harder on climate change. I have to do something more so that our kids and grandkids can have good lives.”

Reporting credit: Sarah Kennedy/ChavoBart Digital Media.

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